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Chicago Immigration Advocates Law Offices

The Chicago immigration lawyers at Chicago Immigration Advocates Law Offices have decades long history of success helping immigrants get their citizenship. If you are from a foreign country seeking a green card in the United States, our attorneys are here to make your transition an easy one.

Entering and getting permanent residency in the U.S. can be challenging. Many who seek a better life in America must navigate the immigration process and its many requirements. If you need help with immigration laws for permanent residency, establishing businesses, or other petitions, you should reach out to immigration lawyers in Chicago.

Chicago Immigration Advocates Law Offices has a legal team with over two decades of experience in immigration law. With our strong knowledge of the immigration process, our law group has helped many clients successfully navigate their immigration issues. Even in a very complicated case, our Chicago immigration attorneys can walk you through each option so you make the best choice for you.

Citizenship Law And Naturalization

Our law firm has helped clients who qualify to apply for U.S. citizenship according to nationality law. We've also assisted those who immigrated to the country and want to enjoy all of its benefits and rights.

U.S. Citizenship Basic Qualifications

If you have foreign citizenship and wish to become a U.S. citizen, an immigration attorney from our Chicago office can check if you meet the basic requirements. They can also help you with the documents that establish meeting these qualifications.

Some of the basic requirements for acquiring U.S. citizenship under immigration law include the following:

  • Can speak, read, and write English at a basic level
  • Demonstrates good moral character
  • Has continuously resided in the U.S. for five years and in their state of residence for at least three months
  • Actual presence in the United States
  • Shows belief in the U.S. Constitution and its principles

Waivers And Exemptions From Citizenship Requirements

Our law group can also see if you can get a waiver or exemption from these requirements in certain conditions, such as:

  • Marriage to a U.S. citizen
  • Membership in the U.S. Army
  • Derivative citizenship from one or both parents

If you've struggled with your application, an immigration attorney from our law group can frame your situation in the best light possible to the USCIS. Even clients who have no criminal record or immigration law issues have experienced setbacks that make it challenging to obtain citizenship. But with the help of our lawyers, we can go through every detail to ensure that you supply complete, correct information to smoothen the process.

Green Cards

One of the most common immigration matters that our law group handles for clients is a green card application. There are two kinds of these cards: those for permanent residents, and those for conditional residents. Here’s a quick explanation of each kind.

Permanent Resident Cards

The Permanent Resident Card enables its holders to live and work permanently in the country for ten years. There are different categories that make applicants eligible for a permanent resident card, each with its own requirements. These are:

  • Through family
  • Through employment
  • Through registry
  • As a special immigrant
  • Refugee/asylee status
  • Human trafficking and crime victims
  • Victims of abuse
  • Other categories

Conditional Resident Status Cards

There are also green cards known as Conditional Resident Status Cards. These are only valid for two years. Within 90 days before their expiry, their holders need to submit requirements that remove conditions on their residency. These conditional cards are typically issued to those married to U.S. citizens with a marriage less than two years old at the time the residency was granted. They are also granted to stepchildren whose parents face this marriage issue.

Prevent Delays And Denials With Help From Our Immigration Attorneys

Applying for or renewing either green card requires complicated documentation, and the smallest omission can delay your green card's issuance. Something as simple as a misspelled address or omitted middle name can lead to prolonged processing time for Conditional Resident Status Card.

In the worst cases, some green card applications have been denied over simple errors. To avoid the delay or denial of your green card application, seek help from a Chicago immigration attorney. Our law group can double-check all  necessary documentation for family-based, employment-based, or asylum/refugee-based green cards.

Deferred Action

The U.S. government recognizes that many undocumented immigrants are minors who are staying in the country because of their parents. Luckily, UCIS allows them temporary exemptions under Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

Relief under this exemption is granted on a case-to-case basis. These are some of the criteria that our clients have had to meet to qualify for deferred action:

  • Entry into the U.S. before the age of 16
  • Living continuously in the U.S. for at least five years, starting from June 15, 2007 until the present
  • No convictions for felonies or serious/multiple misdemeanors
  • Does not pose a threat to national safety and security
  • Graduated from high school, is currently enrolled in school, has a GED, or has received an honorable discharge from the military

Proving these qualifications requires a lot of complicated, detailed documentation. The more evidence that an immigration attorney can provide to establish your qualification for DACA, the higher your chances of being exempted. Talk to our firm attorneys so they can help you establish a strong case for exemption.

Family-Based Immigration Services

Our attorneys have worked with many clients who are U.S. citizens that want to help their spouses or family members share in the American Dream. Family-based immigration law applies to the visa application process of the spouses, children, siblings, and parents of United States citizens or legal permanent residents (LPRs). The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 provides an unlimited number of immigrant visas for immediate relatives, but other kinds of relatives will be subject to country and category limits on the number of visas that are available each year.

Immediate relatives include:

  • Spouses of United States citizens
  • Unmarried children of United States citizens who are under 21 years of age
  • Adopted children of United States citizens who were adopted before 16 years of age
  • Parents of United States citizens when United States citizens are older than 21 years of age

Family-preference immigrants, in order of preference, include:

  1. Unmarried sons and daughters of United States citizens and their minor children
  2. Spouses, minor children, and unmarried sons and daughters 21 years and older of LPRs
  3. Married sons and daughters of United States citizens and their spouses and children
  4. Brothers and sisters of United States citizens, and their spouses and minor children, when United States citizens are at least 21 years old

Work-Based Immigration

Foreign employees or employers need work-based visas to reside and work/operate businesses in the U.S. The United States has five categories of employment-based immigrant visas for those seeking to immigrate based on their job skills. Here's a breakdown of all five categories:

  • First Preference EB-1 visas: for noncitizens of extraordinary ability, outstanding professors or researchers, or certain multinational executives or managers
  •  
  • Second Preference EB-2 visas: for members of professions holding advanced degrees or their equivalents, or people of exceptional ability
  •  
  • Third Preference EB-3 visas: for skilled workers, professionals, or other workers performing unskilled labor requiring less than two years training or experience and not of a temporary or seasonal nature
  •  
  • Fourth Preference EB-4 visas: for special immigrants who are either religious workers, Special Immigrant Juveniles, certain types of broadcasters, certain types of retired officers, or employees of a G-4 international organization or North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-6 civilian employees and their family members, certain employees of the United States government who are abroad and their family members, members of the United States armed forces, Panama Canal company or Canal Zone government employees, certain physicians licensed and practicing medicine in a state as of January 9, 1978, Afghan or Iraqi translators or interpreters, Iraqis who were employed by or on behalf of the United States government, and Afghans who were employed by the United States government or International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
  •  
  • EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program: allows investors (and their spouses and unmarried children under 21) to apply for Green Cards (permanent residence) if they make necessary investments in commercial enterprises in the United States and have plans to create or preserve 10 permanent full-time jobs for qualified American workers.

Removal Defense

Title 8 U.S. Code § 1227 identifies multiple classes of deportable aliens. These are some of the most common grounds for removal proceedings that we've handled for our clients:

  • Violation of visa conditions
  • Being deemed a threat to public safety
  • Criminal charges, such as marriage fraud or aggravated felonies
  • Staying in the U.S. without proper documentation

The process begins when United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) accuses a noncitizen of being removable. When a person is placed in deportation proceedings, they are scheduled to appear before an immigration judge who decides whether to order the person to be deported.

Other removal proceedings may include expedited removals for people who are in the United States without documentation. They may also remove those who have misrepresented material facts in order to obtain admission, or reinstate the removal of those who were ordered deported but returned to the United States without permission. After an adverse immigration decision by a judge, parties have the right to appeal.

If you are facing removal, it’s in your best interest to contact a Chicago immigration attorney as soon as you can. Our dedicated Chicago immigration attorneys work ‘round the clock to establish strong legal defenses for our clients.

Tell our immigration attorneys more about your situation so our legal team can establish the best removal defense. Our firm attorneys have won numerous deportation cases, allowing our clients to remain in the U.S. We've also helped clients who previously lost their cases by filing timely, detailed appeals.

Federal Litigation

Some immigrants experience unusual delays or issues with the Department of Homeland Security. Do you have a naturalization law issue that hasn't been resolved, or has your citizenship law matter been pending for a long time? If so, it's best to hire immigration lawyers to ask the federal courts for a decision.

Consult our immigration lawyers to find out if filing a lawsuit would be beneficial in your situation. For naturalization applications, our legal team can file a lawsuit only after 120 days have passed since your interview during the application process.

For other petitions, there are different periods that must pass before a Chicago immigration lawyer can file a lawsuit. We encourage you to contact our law firm, so we can assign an experienced immigration lawyer in Chicago, IL to your case.

Non-Immigrant Visas

If you wish to temporarily stay in the U.S., you need to apply for a non-immigrant visa. Applicants need a specific reason for being in the United States. Reasons for successful visa applications include tourism, employment, and educational opportunities. 

Here are some of the many valid purposes for obtaining a non-immigrant visa:

  • Exchange visits from students in foreign schools
  • Medical treatment
  • Business
  • Member of airplane or ship crew
  • Transit (passing through the U.S. en route to another destination)

These various purposes have different visa classifications, and they don't necessarily lead to approval of permanent residency. Obtaining one can be a complicated task, but our law group has experience in untangling such immigration matters for clients. Call our firm office if you need an immigration lawyer to help you with the process.

Where To Find Work And Education

One of the biggest immigration goals is to find a meaningful job or a good school placement in a timely manner. Fortunately, there are several agencies that help newcomers navigate the immigration process and find work or educational opportunities.

The Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS)

The Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS) maintains a lengthy list of community service agencies handling immigration matters. The City of Chicago also has information about college access for undocumented students.

The Illinois Dream Fund

The Illinois Dream Fund is a kind of college scholarship fund for undocumented immigrants who are ineligible to apply for federal financial aid. The fund is for high school seniors who intend to enroll and current undergraduates enrolled at accredited two or four-year colleges who can apply for the Illinois Dream Fund scholarships. 

All applicants need to have attended school in Illinois for a minimum of three years before graduating or receiving a GED, have at least one parent who immigrated to the United States, and have lived with either a parent or guardian while going to school in Illinois.

The Chicago Public Schools (CPS) Dream Fund 

The CPS Dream Fund Scholarship is another talent and need-based, last-dollar scholarship that assists academically talented undocumented CPS students who are pursuing post-secondary educations. Students need to be recommended by principals, counselors, or college and career coaches and also must have a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 and a minimum ACT score of 17.

World Relief

World Relief is a global Christian humanitarian organization that helps refugees and other immigrants find employment in the United States. World Relief partners with a network of employers who value the experiences of immigrants. Plus, clients seeking a job through World Relief earn an average wage 184 percent above the federal minimum wage.

Where To Find Housing

Finding affordable housing is a pressing concern for many immigrants to the United States. Here are some agencies that can help those looking for a home.

City Of Chicago - Office Of New Americans

The City of Chicago has a lengthy list of community resources providing support to immigrants seeking housing

The Illinois Legal Aid Foundation

The Illinois Legal Aid Foundation has a list of immigrant family support organizations. Organizations listed here can help people obtain food stamps (SNAP), housing, or medical care.

The Resurrection Project

The Resurrection Project was established by six local parishes focusing on helping residents with property management, real estate development, and financial services and education. Its real estate development efforts include Casa Puebla, a $14.8 million development that led to the creation of 74 units of affordable housing, and Casa Maravilla, a $20 million development that helped create 72 units of affordable senior housing.

The Interfaith Community for Detained Immigrants

The Interfaith Community for Detained Immigrants (ICDI) has coordinated with many communities to offer housing, financial assistance, and case management to people who would have otherwise been detained in cruel and traumatizing conditions. ICDI believes independent no-cost housing is essential to giving people privacy and agency, striving to provide people with spaces that promote healing in neutral settings and encourages independence.

Chicago Immigration Offices

If you need help with issues such as work permits, consular processing, or other immigration services, we suggest contacting these offices in the area:

  • United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Field Office
    101 West Ida B. Wells Drive Chicago, IL 60605 (800) 375-5283
  •  
  • USCIS Application Support Center
    8004 B South Cicero Avenue Burbank, IL 60459-1570 (800) 375-5283
  •  
  • USCIS Asylum Office
    181 West Madison Street Suite 3000 Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 849-5200

Immigrant & Family Friendly Resources

The Greater Chicago Food Depository is a network of over 700 food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, and other programs. It has children’s and school-based programs, older adult programs, and job training.

Esperanza Health Centers is an approved site for immigration physicals, which are typically required for any person applying for LPR status. Esperanza prides itself on providing bilingual, high-quality primary care, behavioral health, and wellness services to the community, regardless of their immigration status, insurance status, or ability to pay.

The Immigrant Family Resource Program (IFRP) provides information on whether you or your family member qualifies for public benefits or other types of assistance.

Get Legal Advice From The Best Immigration Attorney In Chicago

Everyone deserves a shot at the American dream, but many experience complications that can grind their immigration journey to a halt. If you need legal services or help with immigration cases, contact Chicago Immigration Advocates Law Offices.

Schedule a free consultation with us so we can learn more about your immigration needs. With our help, an experienced immigration attorney in Chicago can represent you in court and diligently defend your rights.

Our law group represents individuals in Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Kentucky, but we have represented clients in Immigration Courts in Texas, New York, Louisiana, and California. You can call (312) 704-8000 or contact us online to schedule a free consultation with our firm.

Work-Based Immigration

Our experienced team also works with employers and employees seeking work-based immigration to the United States. The United States has five categories of employment-based immigrant visas seeking to immigrate based on their job skills. The five categories include:

First Preference EB-1 visas for noncitizens of extraordinary ability, outstanding professors or researchers, or certain multinational executives or managers

  • Second Preference EB-2 visas for members of professions holding advanced degrees or their equivalents, or people of exceptional ability
  •  
  • Third Preference EB-3 visas for skilled workers, professionals, or other workers performing unskilled labor requiring less than two years training or experience and not of a temporary or seasonal nature
  •  
  • Fourth Preference EB-4 visas for special immigrants who are either religious workers, Special Immigrant Juveniles, certain types of broadcasters, certain types of retired officers, or employees of a G-4 international organization or North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-6 civilian employees and their family members, certain employees of the United States government who are abroad and their family members, members of the United States armed forces, Panama Canal company or Canal Zone government employees, certain physicians licensed and practicing medicine in a state as of January 9, 1978, Afghan or Iraqi translators or interpreters, Iraqis who were employed by or on behalf of the United States government, and Afghans who were employed by the United States government or International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
  •  
  • The EB-5 Immigrant Investor Program allows investors (and their spouses and unmarried children under 21) to apply for Green Cards (permanent residence) if they make necessary investments in commercial enterprises in the United States and have plans to create or preserve 10 permanent full-time jobs for qualified American workers

Removal Defense

If you are facing removal, it’s in your best interest to contact an attorney as soon as you can. Our skilled Chicago immigration attorneys are committed to providing aggressive removal defense. At Title 8 U.S. Code § 1227 identifies multiple classes of deportable aliens.

The most common way people end up being deported is being placed into removal proceedings for criminal convictions or marriage fraud. The process begins when United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) accuses a noncitizen of being removable. When a person is placed in deportation proceedings, they are scheduled to appear before an immigration judge who decides whether to order the person to be deported or not.

Other removal proceedings may include expedited removals for people who are in the United States without documentation or have misrepresented material facts in order to obtain admission and reinstatement of removal for people who were ordered deported and came back to the United States without permission. Following an adverse immigration decision by a judge, people do have the right to appeal the decisions, but will want to have a Chicago immigration attorney.

A Multicultural Metropolis

According to CMAP, the seven-county CMAP region of Cook County, DuPage County, Kane County, Kendall County, Lake County, McHenry County, and Will County grew by more than a quarter-million people during one decade, and immigrants accounted for over half of the population growth during this time period. Cook County, in particular, saw a more than 20 percent increase in the number of immigrants.

Immigrants make up more than 500,000 residents, or 21.2 percent, of Chicago. Additional cities with high immigrant populations in the Chicago area include Stone Park (46.5 percent), Niles (44.2 percent), Schiller Park (44.2 percent), Cicero (42.6 percent), Wheeling (42.0 percent), and Skokie (41.1 percent).

The top countries of origin for foreign-born people in the seven-county CMAP region include Mexico (40.4 percent), Poland (8.6 percent), India (7.2 percent), the Philippines (4.8 percent), and China (3.0 percent). Whereas 12.9 percent of the United States population is foreign-born, 13.8 percent of the Illinois population is foreign-born, 19.1 percent of the seven-county CMAP region is foreign-born, and 21.2 percent of Cook County is foreign-born.

PBS notes that Chicago’s immigration history stretches back to 1850, and every decade saw waves of immigrants to the city. French immigrants who were political refugees came to Chicago in 1850, Scottish immigrants arrived in 1860, Norwegians joined the labor force in 1870, Irish immigrants worked on the construction of the canal connecting Chicago with the Illinois River in 1880, British trade unions sponsored immigration in 1890, Czechs from Bohemia came to Chicago in 1900, Austrian immigrants settled into the Fuller Park neighborhood in 1910, Russian immigrants fled persecutions in 1920, Germans flooded into Chicago in 1930, Swedish immigrants settled into the Andersonville neighborhood in 1940, Polish immigrants began arriving in 1950, Italian immigrants came in 1960, Mexican immigrants began arriving in 1970, Filipinos began immigrating in 1980, and Korean immigrants were drawn to Chicago in 1990.

The City of Chicago website notes that in the half-century following the Great Chicago Fire in October 1871, waves of immigrants came to Chicago to take jobs in factories and meatpacking plants. Many poor workers and their families found help in settlement houses operated by Jane Addams and her followers.

Things to do in Chicago

There are a number of immigrant-related destinations for people to visit in Chicago. Some examples include:

  • Jane Addams Hull-House Museum — The Hull-House is located on the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago, 800 South Halsted Street in Chicago. The museum does not charge an admission fee for individuals or groups, but does encourage donations of $5 per person, although nobody will be turned away. Exhibits in the Hull-House include the Benedict Gallery, named after Enella Benedict, the founder and long-time director of the Hull-House Art School who was also one of the longest serving residents. “Learning Together: Art, Education, and Community” is a research and development project exploring Chicago’s history of arts education. The Jane Addams Hull-House Museum also has a collection made up of over 5,500 artifacts relating to the work of the Hull-House Settlement and the surrounding neighborhood.
  • Pilsen Murals — Mosaics detailing Mexican icons can be found at Cooper Dual Language Academy (1645 West 18th Street), Jeff Zimmerman’s painted works detailing the people and cultures of Pilsen (1900 South Ashland Avenue) and Francisco Mendoza’s glass-tile mosaics at Orozco Community Academy (1645 West 18th Place). Additional murals can be found at 1416 West 18th Street, 1100 West Cullerton Street, 1815 South Paulina Street, 1447 West 18th Street, and other locations throughout the Pilsen neighborhood.
  • Humboldt Park Mural Art Program — The mission of the Humboldt Park Mural Art Program (HP MAP) involves creating new murals, restoring old murals, and developing strategies using murals as a way to represent community issues, ideas, and vision. Humboldt Park saw large numbers of German, Scandinavians, and Italians moving in from neighborhoods to the east, and then Polish and Russian Jews, as well as Ukrainians moved into Humboldt Park. Later on, Humboldt Park’s diverse neighborhood grew to include Puerto Ricans. 
  • Las Puertas de Paseo Boricua (the Puerto Rican doors) — Sixteen doors on Division Street between Western and California were transformed as part of the Year of Public art with the Chicago Cultural Center. The artwork features a combination of Puerto Rican artists, including Mexicans, Columbians, Ecuadorians, and Costa Ricans. Las Puertas del Paseo Boricua was also a documentary about the 13 Latino Artists.
  • National Museum of Mexican Art (NMMA) — Originally founded as the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum in 1982, the museum expanded to a 48,000 square-foot, state-of-the-art facility in 2001 in the heart of Pilsen and unveiled a new name in 2006 as the NMMA. The museum has a mission to stimulate knowledge and appreciation of Mexican art and culture through a permanent collection of Mexican art, visual and performing arts programs, arts education programs, and resources and professional development of Mexican artists.
  • National Museum of Puerto Rican Arts & Culture (NMPRAC) — The NMPRAC has a commitment to promotion, integration, and advancement of Puerto Rican arts and culture with exhibitions and programming that enhances the visibility and importance of the Puerto Rican arts tradition. Located in Humboldt Park, NMPRAC is the only self-standing museum in the nation devoted to showcasing Puerto Rican arts and cultural exhibitions year-round. It was founded in 2000 by members of Chicago’s Puerto Rican community and local supporters of arts and culture, and its early years focused on renovating the historic Humboldt Park Stables and Receptory building of cultural and historical significance to Chicago since the late 1800s. The museum was named the latest City of Chicago’s Museums in the Park in February 2012.

Where to Find Work

The Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS) maintains a lengthy list of community service agencies serving immigrants. The City of Chicago also has information about college access for undocumented students.

The Illinois Dream Fund is a kind of college scholarship fund for undocumented immigrants who are ineligible to apply for federal financial aid. The fund is for high school seniors who intend to enroll and current undergraduates enrolled at accredited two- or four-year colleges who can apply for the Illinois Dream Fund scholarships. 

All applicants need to have attended school in Illinois for a minimum of three years before graduating or receiving a GED, need to have at least one parent who immigrated to the United States, and must have lived with either a parent or guardian while going to school in Illinois.

The Chicago Public Schools (CPS) Dream Fund Scholarship is another talent and need-based, last-dollar scholarship that assists academically talented undocumented CPS students who are pursuing post-secondary educations. Students need to be recommended by principals, counselors, or college and career coaches and also must have a minimum grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 and a minimum ACT score of 17.

World Relief is a global Christian humanitarian organization that helps refugees and other immigrants find employment in the United States. World Relief partners with a network of employers who value the experiences of immigrants, and clients seeking a job through World Relief earn an average wage 184 percent above the federal minimum wage.

Where to Find Housing?

The City of Chicago has a lengthy list of community resources providing support to immigrants. Find addresses and phone numbers for a number of organizations that can assist people in finding housing.

The Illinois Legal Aid Foundation also has a list of immigrant family support organizations. Organizations listed here can help people obtain food stamps (SNAP), housing, or medical care.

The Resurrection Project was established by six local parishes focusing on helping residents with property management, real estate development, and financial services and education. Its real estate development efforts have includes Casa Puebla, which is a $14.8 million development that led to the creation of 74 units of affordable housing, and Casa Maravilla, a $20 million development that helped create 72 units of affordable senior housing.

The Interfaith Community for Detained Immigrants (ICDI) has coordinated with many communities to offer housing, financial assistance, and case management to people who would have otherwise been detained in cruel and traumatizing conditions. ICDI believes independent no-cost housing is essential to giving people privacy and agency, and strives to provide people with spaces that promote healing in neutral settings and encourages independence.

Chicago Immigration Offices

Immigration offices in the Chicago area include:

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Field Office101 West Ida B. Wells DriveChicago, IL 60605(800) 375-5283

USCIS Application Support Center8004 B South Cicero AvenueBurbank, IL 60459-1570(800) 375-5283

USCIS Asylum Office181 West Madison StreetSuite 3000Chicago, IL 60602(312) 849-5200

Immigrant & Family Friendly Resources

The Greater Chicago Food Depository is a hub for a network of over 700 food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, and other programs. It has children’s and school-based programs, older adult programs, and job training.

Esperanza Health Centers is an approved site for immigration physicals, which are typically required for any person applying for lawful permanent resident (LPR) status. Esperanza prides itself on providing bilingual, high quality primary care, behavioral health, and wellness services to the community, regardless of their immigration status, insurance status, or ability to pay.

The Immigrant Family Resource Program (IFRP) provides information on whether you or your family member qualifies for public benefits or other types of assistance.

Call Us Today to Speak with a Chicago Immigration Lawyer

If you need assistance with any kind of immigration-related issue in the Chicagoland area, you do not want to be representing yourself in court. Make sure to contact Chicago Immigration Advocates Law Offices for a diligent legal defense of your rights.

Our firm represents individuals in Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Kentucky, but we have represented people in Immigration Courts in Texas, New York, Louisiana, and California. You can call (312) 704-8000 or contact us online to schedule a free consultation.

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